Wednesday, October 7, 2020

Montana Sportsmen Alliance 2020 Endorsed Candidates

 Folks, The following are folks who have received the MSA endorsement for the 2020 election.  We spend a lot of time looking over candidates and their platforms, past performance, and giving a survey and possible face to face interviews.  We are confident in these folks.  We don't care about party affiliation.

Make sure you get out and vote and consider how these folks stand on our issues!!!

 

 Steve Bullock    US Senate


Kathleen Williams   US House

Mike Cooney-Casey Schreiner    Governor-Lt. Governor

Melissa Romano    Superintendent

Bryce Bennett   Secretary of State

Shane Morigeau   Auditor

Raph Graybill   Attorney General

Mike Black  Supreme Court

HD 3   Debo Powers


HD  47   Katharin Kelker 

HD  48  Jessica Karjala

HD 49   Emma Kerr-Carpenter

HD   59  Dan Vermillion

HD   81  Mary Caferro

HD  83   Kim Abbott

HD  84  Mary Ann Dunwell

HD  89   Katie Sullivan

HD  90  Marilyn Marler

HD  94  Tom France

HD  98   Willis Curdy

HD  100  Andrea Olsen

SD   39  Gordon Pierson


Tuesday, September 29, 2020

Cooney: the Right Choice for Montana Hunters and Anglers


    “Why do you live in Montanan?” This simple question might generate a surprising number of answers. However, I doubt we would hear much about low taxes or balmy winter weather, because we don’t have them. Instead, an appreciation of the state’s wildlife, wild places, and outdoor recreational opportunities would likely head the list.
    All of us who fall into that demographic need to realize the importance of this November’s election. Due to the unique political climate of the times, the presidential contest will likely receive most of the attention. However, a number of races unique to Montana will likely have more immediate impact on our lives, none more so than the race for the governorship, in which differences in the candidates’ views on issues crucial to our outdoor heritage could not be clearer.
    No one can control the location of their birthplace, and everyone not lucky enough to be born in Montana has a right to locate here, including East Coast billionaire Greg Gianforte. Most such new arrivals soon learn some appreciation for local values, a process with which Gianforte seems to have exceptional difficulty.
    He got off to a terrible start in 2009 by filing a lawsuit against the Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, seeking to invalidate a previously negotiated public easement allowing access to the East Gallatin River across his land. He followed through by selecting as his running mate Kristen Juras, an attorney who has written extensively about landowners “right to exclude” access to public lands and waters.
    In the interval, Gianforte’s position on these issues has grown muddled by “green-washing,” a dishonest process by which politicians with a long history of opposition to public access and similar issues suddenly become their champions. This tactic is especially likely in states like ours, where hunters and anglers form such a large voting bloc. Gianforte now touts his vote in favor of full funding of the Land and Water Conservation Act—once it was clear that this bill was going to pass and after he voted against it once and refused to co-sponsor it at the request of his constituents. Coupled with his support for virulent public land opponent William Pendley (recently removed from office after becoming a political liability) as Bureau of Land Management head and his statements supporting privatization of Montana public land, it’s not hard to tell where his heart really lies.
    His opponent, Mike Cooney, offers a stark contrast. During four decades of experience in state government, he has consistently supported programs of vital importance to Montana sportsmen and women, such as Habitat Montana, the Block Management program, the Public Lands Access Act, the Montana Stream Access law, and the Department of Natural Resources and Conservation. Cooney did not support these policies overnight with an eye to an upcoming election. He has championed these positions from the time he was first elected to the Montana legislature throughout his term as Lieutenant Governor.
    No matter whether they hunt, fish, or enjoy the outdoors by other means, Montanans who value these freedoms are facing a period of exceptional challenge. So, ask yourself another simple question. Would you be comfortable with Greg Gianforte supervising the State Land Board or determining the fate of our stream access law? Neither would I. That’s why I’m voting for Mike Cooney and encouraging friends to do the same.

                                Don Thomas
                                Lewistown
 

Sportsmen/women, Defeat Gianforte!!!

 This November, a number of Montana races are important and the margins are tight. But the outcome of the governor’s race is the most crucial for the future of regular sportsmen. Will Montana remain the last best place or the last place to be bested?
The Montana Sportsmen Alliance encourages all Montanans to vote for Mike Cooney and here’s why: his opponent, Greg Gianforte, is an entitled East Coast carpetbagger who is aligning with other millionaires - many he met while in Congress - to turn Montana into part industrial honey-pot and part playground for the rich.
Gianforte would happily turn us into a state where the rich own or run everything, and regular Montanans could no longer hunt, fish or camp without permission or a payout. Remember, to the rich, average Joes and Janes with less than six-digit incomes are just losers, to be manipulated if possible, then tossed aside.
Montana has had to suffer such men before. Look at the Copper Kings of the 1890s. Marcus Daly, William Clark and Augustus Heinze rolled into Butte, pilfered the land, abused the miners and amassed their riches. William Clark even tried to buy his way into a Congressional seat when state legislatures controlled who landed in the U.S. Senate. Clark is reported to have said, "I never bought a man who wasn't for sale."
Now, the rich and the industries that make men rich have once again turned their eye on Montana. But these men are filthy rich, making the Copper Kings look like pikers, and they come armed with influence and the computer technology to manipulate the masses.
Look at Gianforte himself, trying to buy the governor’s seat just like William Clark. Montana fortunately has campaign contribution limits, but that doesn’t apply to the candidate himself. So Gianforte has contributed $3.6 million to his own campaign, something few other Montanans could do. This is a gap in Montana’s campaign laws that should be fixed.
Take away Gianforte’s contribution and his coffers start looking a lot more like that of Cooney, who has raised about $2.5 million.
But then, look at who else is contributing to Gianforte’s campaign. The list is a who’s-who of out-of-state U.S. millionaires that confirms America has become an oligarchy, which is the political domination of a wealthy few. And they know Gianforte is for sale.
A few of the more notable are:
 HYPERLINK "https://www.forbes.com/profile/thomas-peterffy/" \l "170a932e1c0f" Thomas Peterffy of Florida, a Hungarian immigrant and digital trading pioneer whose net worth is estimated at $16.6 billion. He also owns 500,000 acres of Florida timberland.
Ted Uihlein of Kansas, great-grandson of a Schlitz Brewing founder, who has emerged as the biggest GOP donor in the nation, donating more than $21 million to tea party candidates in the 2018 midterms alone.
Koch Industries, a Koch Brothers conglomerate
The Reynolds American Tobacco Company
Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts, whose net worth is $50 million, ran TD Ameritrade and co-owns the Chicago Cubs baseball team
North Dakota Gov. Douglas J. Burgum, who, similar to Gianforte, made his money – $1.1 billion – by selling his software company to Microsoft.
And of course, JoAnn Wilks, wife of Farris Wilks. The Wilks Brothers made their $3.2 billion in fracking and then bought ranches in Montana. Along one ranch, they blocked a road to the Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument and then tried to pressure the Bureau of Land Management into swapping the road for the Durfee Hills, BLM land surrounded by another of their ranches. Sportsmen rallied to protest and defeat the deal. But last year, they  HYPERLINK "https://idahonews.com/news/local/another-road-closure-reported-on-billionaire-wilks-brothers-idaho-land" were still blocking roads in Idaho.

Fortunately, Montana hasn’t completely followed the nation into oligarchy. Montanans tend to be an independent lot who support campaign contribution limits and ignore party politics to vote for candidates who do the right thing. Or at least more than the other guy.
Cooney is the guy who will do the right thing for sportsmen. A native Montanan, he has already proven himself as a Montana legislator. He can balance the Republican-led Legislature to keep Montana from careening off the tracks into extremism. He’s already published his “Protect the Last Best Place” plan, which reiterates support for policies that Montanans care about like Habitat Montana and stream access.
Montanans have fought for some of the best stream access laws in the country, but it wouldn’t take much to lose it if rich landowners pushed a bill to lock the public out. After trying to lock anglers out of the East Gallatin River flowing along his property, Gianforte might finagle a bill himself. The Republican Legislature would pass it, and Gianforte would sign it with a greedy flourish.
Because Gianforte is for sale.
Governors can stand up to a Congress that tries to overreach. So if Congress ever made the mistake of considering a federal land giveaway, Cooney and other smart governors could push back. Gianforte would not. In fact, he’d probably put the land under Montana’s ownership and then funnel it to his millionaire buddies, claiming a need to “raise money for the state.”
Because Gianforte is for sale.
This may be Cooney vs. Gianforte but it’s really Montana vs. the millionaires. Montana is the last best place, because so far, we haven’t been bought.
Let’s show them we aren’t for sale.
Let’s not make 2020 the year we fold.
Vote Cooney-Schreiner.

MSA Leadership Team

Tuesday, July 7, 2020

Standing on the Shoulders of Giants



Twitter: EmwhOrgwww.EMWH.org

July 7, 2020

“If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of Giants.”

Standing on the Shoulders of Giants

Montana has many natural, public resource treasures to be in awe of - Jim Posewitz was one of our treasures.

Jim not only work as a public trustee with Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks from 1961-1993, but as a dedicated conservation communicator, upon retiring, founded Orion, The Hunter's Institute, and was a member of or worked with numerous conservation groups across the state and nationally.

Jim passed away on the 3rd of July; my heart is heavy, he will be greatly missed.

I met Jim at a conservation meeting in 2012. I was asked to introduce myself, briefly explained my background with ancient historical and archaeology research. During the next break, Jim Posewitz walked over, a big grin on his face, extended his right hand to shake mine, then handed me 4 of his books he had written. I had met a kindred soul. We bonded over history and I became a conservation history student, of sorts, of Poz. His bredth and interconnectedness of knowledge, between history, conservation, politics, and science, was pure joy to me.

After I created my first editorial cartoon for the newsletter, to cathartically vent, Jim called, laughingly telling me I had been holding out on him. Jim loved editorial cartoons. There were a small handful of friends I would run my cartoons by, to polish them with suggestions, and Jim was a big one. I loved his sarcastic sense of humor, which editorial cartoons are a perfect vehicle for. 

Jim explained the Public Trust Doctrine and North American Model of Wildlife conservation, which he wove into many a future conversation. Poz told me how he wasn't taught history or philosophy or ethics in college, while he was getting his degrees in Wildlife Management; subjects he said, were at the core of what he would do with the rest of his life. Looking to communicate his many conservation ideas, he was directed to a writing manual, which he used to communicate his conservation & ethics ideology in the many articles and books he wrote.



Posewitz wrote Beyond Fair Chase, Taking A Bullet For Conservation, Inherit The Hunt, Rifle In Hand, and his latest book, My Best Shot.

I asked Jim if I could video interview him, earlier this year, before all the COVID quarantining hit. Even as things were getting more difficult with his health, he still loved sharing his wealth of knowledge, his humor and passion.


I, and so many others Jim touched and taught, will greatly miss this giant of a man. May Poz continue to inspire us all.


"It has never been more important for individual conservationists in the state to step up, be heard, and take action. We must, in Tawney’s words, 'fight like hell to pass it on to the next generation.'

We can’t squander the legacy of the giants who came before us. And we must make sure we elect men and women who understand that legacy and embrace it."

_________________


Jim Bailey, of the Montana Wild Bison Restoration Coalition, recently sent out this newsletter.

"Hello, First and foremost, this is to inform you that our friend in wildlife conservation, Jim Posewitz passed on to his happy hunting ground on July 3. It is a great loss to the communities of wildlife conservation, hunters and all. Jim was a leader in wildlife management and for responsible conservation ethics during his career with Montana Fish & Game, now Fish, Wildlife & Parks. In retirement, he founded Orion the Hunters Institute and wrote several books on hunters’ ethics. He challenged us all to accept our mutual public-trust responsibilities for the wildlife resource, including its foundations in the land. We miss him sorely. 

A few months ago, the Montana Wild Bison Restoration Coalition took some video of Jim speaking about the history of Montana wildlife conservation and about his support for restoring public-trust wild bison in Montana. We intended to produce another video, featuring Jim, for informing the public of issues related to bison restoration. But the project was put on hold for lack of funds. Now, we want to complete the project, making it broadly available, as another tribute to Jim.

We are soliciting contributions for this project. If you can, please contribute." (click link)




Click to be a Contributor or Subscriber to 
Enhancing Montana's Wildlife & Habitat





Thank you,
Kathryn QannaYahu
406-579-7748
www.EMWH.org
Helena, MT
Click to Subscribe to the EMWH newsletter, and type "subscribe" in the subject line. 
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Sunday, June 7, 2020

Urgent-Need Comments on Madison River Plan

Urgent-Need Comments on Madison River Plan
I’m not sure if you have heard, but FWP has a proposal out in draft form to regulate commercial use on the Madison River. The plan does the following:
A cap on commercial trips on the upper Madison River, similar to what is already in place on the Big Hole and Beaverhead Rivers.
Two days of rest-rotation on the upper Madison River. Similar to the Big Hole and Beaverhead Rivers, areas where commercial use is not allowed on a particular day. On the Madison River FWP is proposing Saturday Varney Bridge to Ennis and on Sundays Lyons Bridge to Palisades boat launch.
Seasonal walk/wade sections, similar to the current regulations. Quake Lake to Lyons Bridge and Ennis to Ennis Lake, June 15-September 30. This element is intended to give wading anglers some relief for the relentless floating traffic the Madison River experiences. Thankfully, FWP crafted this element in a way that addresses our stream access concerns. Outside of this time period, it appears these sections would be open to fishing from boats.
You can download the full EA at this link: http://fwp.mt.gov/…/inside…/commission/meetings/agenda.html… preferred alternative begins on page 24.

Not surprisingly, The Montana Outfitter and Guides Association (MOGA) and the Fishing Outfitters Association of Montana (FOAM) are trying to deny you the opportunity to comment on this very important public access issue. They know that if this document ever sees the light of day, the public will once again show overwhelming support and insist on implementation.
To counteract MOGA and FOAM we need people to write email to the commission members urging them to put the EA out for public comment. Their meeting is Thursday, June 12, so time is of the essence. Would you be willing to send an email in support to the following email addresses? These are the commissioners and senior staff at FWP. fwcomm@mt.gov; Eileen Ryce <eryce@mt.gov>; Martha Williams <martha.williams@mt.gov>; scolton@yellowstonelaw.com; Fwpdistrict2 <fwpdistrict2@gmail.com>; lwbrower@yahoo.com; rstuker@itsTriangle.com; cartim8@gmail.com
If you are willing to do this, please share this email anyone else that you think would help. We are on the cusp of landmark achievement on the Madison River, this is literally a once in a lifetime opportunity. If we fail in 2020, we may never get this chance again.

Please help!

Thursday, May 21, 2020

Daily Interlake Montana’s outdoor recreation traditions are at stake in the Republican primary



Montana’s outdoor recreation traditions are at stake in the Republican primary

by Andrew McKean
| May 10, 2020 1:00 AM
Those of us Montanans who like to hunt, fish, and hike just want to do more of it, unburdened by the political implications of our activities.
Of course, it’s hard to escape politics, even far from the trailhead or the boat launch. Our ability to access rivers and streams in the state is itself a political expression, an ability won by passionate access advocates and then upheld by our courts. Our ability to hunt public wildlife is assured only because people who came before us understood that without access to the state’s elk and deer herds, bighorn sheep bands, and grouse coveys, they’re private property for all practical purposes.
Even our ability to hike, ride, or drive our public lands without encountering industrial facilities like gas fields or abandoned mines is dependent on which administration is in charge of public-land management decisions.
Given that politics is about choice, this year’s Montana governor’s race offers a stark alternative between candidates who have vowed to uphold our hard-fought traditions of access, public management of public wildlife, and citizen-crafted policies and those who would close our streams, profit from our public wildlife, and leave management decisions to a crony crew of insiders.
In the Democratic primary, the public-access and public-trust policies that have made Montana a destination for outdoorsfolk and stoked the engine of our outdoors economy are shared by most candidates. It’s on the Republican side that the starkest choices await primary voters.
Our current one-term Congressman, Greg Gianforte, has had problems with Montana’s stream-access law since he tried to block legal access to a fork of the Gallatin River across his property near Bozeman. A settlement with Fish, Wildlife and Parks resulted in mitigating some of the impacts by public recreationists, but the issue remains: Gianforte’s instinct is to defer to private-property rights, even when the law — and tradition — of public recreation access is clear.
That instinct has been formalized and intensified with Gianforte’s pick for his lieutenant governor, Kristen Juras, a former law professor who has written that landowners should have the “right to exclude” the public from legally accessible waterways. How would Montana’s remarkable stream-access law fare in a Gianforte-Juras administration?
Gianforte’s main Republican opponent, current Montana Attorney General Tim Fox and running mate Jon Knokey, have distributed a detailed outdoor strategy in which they pledge to not only uphold traditional recreational access, including to Montana’s streams and rivers, but they’ve committed to improving access to the state’s 3 million acres of inaccessible public land.
Then there’s the issue of access to public wildlife. That’s a bedrock principle of the North American model of wildlife management, but a number of Western states have eroded that pillar by giving quotas of hunting licenses to landowners to sell to whomever they want. It’s called “Ranching for Wildlife” in Colorado and “Cooperative Wildlife Management” in Utah, but it amounts to the same thing – selling the public’s wildlife to the highest bidder.
Gianforte has a demonstrated history of siding with large landowners when it comes to mitigating impacts of wildlife. During his previous run for the governor’s office he said that requiring a landowner to provide public access in order to qualify for tools to offset impacts of wildlife amounts to a taking of private-property rights, even though multiple Supreme Court cases have ruled that wildlife, and the impacts on forage or fences, must be borne by landowners as a “condition of the land.”
It’s a short step from thinking that landowners can do whatever they want with depredating wildlife to rewarding large landowners who harbor big-game herds with hunting licenses that they can sell to outfitters for high-dollar hunts.
Fox and Knokey, meanwhile, have pledged to use incentives to open more private land to public hunting, using access tools like block management to direct hunters to the most problematic big-game herds in the state, and collecting broad and diverse input as the state drafts an elk-management plan that aims to use public hunting as the primary tool to reduce concentrations of elk.
That’s the bright line between the two candidates. One uses the cudgel of the courts to challenge public-access traditions. The other uses collaboration and consultation to resolve friction between private property and public resources.
These differences are ultimately political, but they transcend party affiliation. In this primary election, I encourage Democrats to vote the Republican ballot and cast a ballot that recognizes and continues our Montana values of collaboration and public access to public resources. A Fox/Knokey primary victory would ensure that November’s general election is about other issues — funding for social services, investment in public infrastructure, and rebuilding our agricultural economy — and not about who gets to access our remarkable natural resources.
Ballots are in the mail over the next week. Vote, and then go hiking, fishing, or hunting without having to fret about the political consequences of doing what you love.
Andrew McKean is a freelance outdoor writer and former editor-in-chief of Outdoor Life magazine. He lives in Glasgow.

Voter Guide







2020 Primary Election Gubernatorial Voter Guide

Thank you for being a voter. This – and every – election has significant impacts on our public lands. Your vote makes a difference. 
The gubernatorial race is particularly important because Montana’s governor can make decisions on how the state allocates state funding for public land and conservation projects and has the power to pass or veto bills that have made it through the state legislature. The governor also serves on the Montana Land Board, which makes decisions regarding the management of state trust lands and the acquisition of public lands. Moreover, the governor can use the power of his office as a bully pulpit to speak out on public lands issues at the local, state, and federal level.
Montana's primary election is June 2. 
To best protect public health, this year each of Montana's 56 counties is conducting an all-mail election. It's important to note that while your normal polling place will be closed, you can still register to vote or cast your ballot in person. More information about this election, including how to register to vote, is included in the “Election Information” section below this guide. 
About this Guide
In creating this guide, we sent a questionnaire to each of the candidates for governor. We did not receive responses from the Gianforte or Olszewski campaigns. To determine what their answers to our questions would be, we researched their positions using publicly available information, such as voting records and public statements. Where there was clear evidence of a position, we have answered the question and linked to the source. In cases where the candidate has been asked the question but not provided a clear answer as to their position, the guide reads “uncommitted,” and where there is no record of a candidate’s position, the guide reads “unknown.” 
This guide was paid for by Wild Montana Action Fund
Kim Leighton, Treasurer
80 S. Warren
Helena, MT 59601

2020 Gubernatorial Candidates


greg-gianforte-web.jpg
Greg Gianforte/
Kristen Juras (R)
Endorsements: Family Research Council, Gun Owners of America, and Susan B. Anthony List

cooney-for-web.jpg
Mike Cooney/
Casey Schreiner (D)
Endorsements: Governor Steve Bullock, Senator Jon Tester, former Senator Max Baucus

tim-fox-web.jpg
Tim Fox/
Jon Knokey (R)
Endorsements: Former MT Governor Marc Racicot, Randy Newberg (public lands activist and host of “Fresh Tracks”), Andrew McKean (former editor-in-chief of “Outdoor Life” magazine)

whitney-for-web.jpg
Whitney Williams/
Buzz Mattelin (D)
Endorsements: Governor Brian Schweitzer, former Superintendent of Public Instruction Denise Juneau, and Emily's List

al-for-web.jpg
Al Olszewski/
Ken Bogner (R)
Endorsements: Montanans for Limited Government, Major General Paul E. Valley, Former State Senator Ken Miller

Do you support the transfer of federal public lands ownership to the state?


Republicans
Gianforte/Juras – NO* (source)
Fox/Knokey – NO
Olszewski/Bogner – YES* (source)
Democrats
Williams/Mattelin – NO
Cooney/Schreiner – NO

Do you support the transfer of federal public lands management to the state?


Republicans
Gianforte/Juras – YES* (source)
Fox/Knokey – NO
Olszewski/Bogner – YES* (source)
Democrats
Williams/Mattelin – NO
Cooney/Schreiner – NO

Habitat Montana is a state program that uses out-of-state hunting and fishing license dollars and federal funding to purchase additional public lands and easements for fish and wildlife habitat and hunting access. Do you support using Habitat Montana funds to purchase additional public lands?


Republicans
Gianforte/Juras – NO* (source)
Fox/Knokey – YES
Olszewski/Bogner – UNKNOWN
Democrats
Williams/Mattelin – YES
Cooney/Schreiner – YES

Would you support using state funds to purchase additional lands to create new state parks, fishing access sites, and other recreation and conservation areas?


Republicans
Gianforte/Juras – NO* (source)
Fox/Knokey – YES
Olszewski/Bogner – UNKNOWN
Democrats
Williams/Mattelin – YES
Cooney/Schreiner – YES

Would you support a small increase in state taxes or fees in order to protect water, conserve wildlife habitat, and create more opportunities for outdoor recreation in Montana?


Republicans
Gianforte/Juras – NO* (source)
Fox/Knokey – NO
Olszewski/Bogner – NO* (source)
Democrats
Williams/Mattelin – YES
Cooney/Schreiner – YES

The Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), fed entirely by offshore oil and gas royalties, provides federal funding for local outdoor recreation infrastructure (such as baseball and soccer fields and tennis courts), public land and water access, parks, and other conservation projects in Montana. Do you support full and permanent funding of the Land and Water Conservation Fund?


Republicans
Gianforte/Juras – UNCOMMITTED* (source)
Fox/Knokey – YES
Olszewski/Bogner – UNKNOWN
Democrats
Williams/Mattelin – YES
Cooney/Schreiner – YES

The Montana Water Rights Protection Act (S. 3019) is a piece of federal legislation that would ratify the Confederated Salish Kootenai Tribes' (CSKT) Water Compact that was passed by the Montana Legislature in 2015. Do you support the Montana Water Rights Protection Act?


Republicans
Gianforte/Juras – UNCOMMITTED* (source)
Fox/Knokey – YES
Olszewski/Bogner – NO* (source)
Democrats
Williams/Mattelin – YES
Cooney/Schreiner – YES

In 2017 and 2018, Sen. Daines and Rep. Gianforte both introduced legislation (S. 2206, H.R. 5148, and H.R. 5149) that together would have eliminated 29 of Montana’s 44 wilderness study areas. Do you support this legislation?


Republicans
Gianforte/Juras – YES*
Fox/Knokey – NO
Olszewski/Bogner – YES* (source)
Democrats
Williams/Mattelin – NO
Cooney/Schreiner – NO

The Blackfoot Clearwater Stewardship Act (BCSA) (S. 1765) is a collaborative proposal crafted by local community members representing timber, ranching, outfitting, conservation, recreation, and other interests. The act would create recreation areas for snowmobiling and mountain biking near Ovando, as well as enlarge the Bob Marshall, Scapegoat, and Mission Mountains Wilderness areas. Do you support the Blackfoot Clearwater Stewardship Act?


Republicans
Gianforte/Juras – UNCOMMITTED* (source)
Fox/Knokey – YES
Olszewski/Bogner – YES* (source)
Democrats
Williams/Mattelin – YES
Cooney/Schreiner – YES

Three years ago, Montana created an Office of Outdoor Recreation to work with businesses to help grow the outdoor recreation economy and to support the public lands, wildlife habitat, and waters on which these jobs depend. Do you support funding the Office of Outdoor Recreation to continue this work?


Republicans
Gianforte/Juras – UNKNOWN* (source)
Fox/Knokey – YES
Olszewski/Bogner – UNKNOWN
Democrats
Williams/Mattelin – YES
Cooney/Schreiner – YES

Noncompetitive oil and gas leasing is a practice that enables oil and gas companies to pay $1.50 an acre for leases to public land parcels by bypassing regular Bureau of Land Management bidding processes. Do you support the practice of noncompetitive oil and gas leasing?


Republicans
Gianforte/Juras – UNKNOWN*
Fox/Knokey – YES
Olszewski/Bogner – UNKNOWN*
Democrats
Williams/Mattelin – NO
Cooney/Schreiner – NO

Do you support increasing mitigation and reclamation requirements on oil and gas producers to ensure that development does not impact critical wildlife habitats?


Republicans
Gianforte/Juras – NO* (source)
Fox/Knokey – NO
Olszewski/Bogner – UNKNOWN*
Democrats
Williams/Mattelin – YES
Cooney/Schreiner – YES

In recent years, governors have used the veto power to protect access to public lands and water from bad legislation. Would you veto any bills that negatively impact the access rights of Montanans, including any that threaten the funding or authority of Habitat Montana?


Democrats
Williams/Mattelin – YES
Cooney/Schreiner – YES
Republicans
Gianforte/Juras – UNKNOWN * (source)
Fox/Knokey – YES
Olszewski/Bogner – UNKNOWN*
Election Information 
Ballots were mailed to voters on May 8. If you believe you are registered but did not receive your ballot the following week, you should check your registration status on the Secretary of State's My Voter Page to ensure both your voter registration and mailing addresses are current.
If you need to register to vote or update your address or other information, there is still time. You can complete your voter registration application online through the Secretary of State website and mail a printed copy to your county's elections office. For the primary, your mailed form must be received by May 26. After that, you must visit your county's designated location in person. A list of in-person registration locations is available here. Every eligible Montanan has the right to register to vote up to – and even on – Election Day.
Once you receive and complete your ballot, simply return it in the enclosed, postage-paid envelope. If you prefer to vote in-person, or if you need a replacement ballot, visit your county elections office. Click here for a county-by-county list. You can track your ballot on My Voter Page to see when the county receives it and confirm that it has been accepted. It's important to note that whether you vote by mail or in person, all ballots must be received by your county elections office by 8 p.m. on June 2. 
If you have any questions about ballot delivery or the registration process, do not hesitate to call your county election administrator. They are ready to serve Montanans in these unprecedented times.
To stay in-the-know about upcoming elections and legislation that will affect our public lands, please sign up for our email list.